Last edited by Danos
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages found in the catalog.

reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages

Iпё UпёЎriД­ Sherekh

reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages

Russian, Bolorussian, Ukrainian. Edited by George Y. Shevelov and Fred Holling.

by Iпё UпёЎriД­ Sherekh

  • 184 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Columbia University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavic languages -- Readers

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesColumbia Slavic studies
    ContributionsHolling, Fred,
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPG69 S5 1968
    The Physical Object
    Pagination81p.
    Number of Pages81
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18636075M

    Latin was the spoken and written language of antiquity and birthed the Romance languages. It has a long history outside of the Catholic Church. Church Slavonic shares a common root with all Slavic languages and influenced their development, but it is inaccurate to say that Slavic languages stem from Church Slavonic.   The Harvard Library's Slavic collection has thousands of active subscriptions to journals in print format, and dozens in electronic format, covering the same range of subject matter as described in the “Books” section. The Library also subscribes to many major newspapers in microfilm format.

    Through the poetry of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian authors, including Pushkin and Akhmatova, Poetry Reader for Russian Learners helps upper-beginner, intermediate, and advanced Russian students refine their language skills. Poems are coded by level of difficulty. Orders: SLAVICA or Fax: Email: [email protected] Fax: Email: [email protected]

      SLAVIC History of the West Slavic Languages (5) Designed to acquaint majors in Slavic linguistics with the details of the historical development of the phonological and morphological structure of literary Polish, Czech, Slovak, and Upper and Lower Sorbian languages.   Depending on the focus of your research, it may also be helpful to look at that guide as well as those for Medieval Studies, Middle East Studies, Slavic Languages, Gender Studies, History of Art & Architecture, International Relations, or others that you might find on this list.


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Reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages by Iпё UпёЎriД­ Sherekh Download PDF EPUB FB2

A reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages: Russian, Belorussian, Ukrainian by Sherekh, Iı̐Uı̐Łrii. A Reader In The History Of The Eastern Slavic Languages: Russian, Belorussian, Ukrainian [George Y.

Shevelov, Fred Holling] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. An edition of A reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages () A reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages Russian, Belorussian, : Reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages.

New York, Columbia University Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Sherekh, I︠U︡riĭ. Reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages. New York, Columbia University Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: I︠U︡riĭ Sherekh; Fred Holling.

A reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages Russian, Belorussian, Ukrainian. [I︠U︡riĭ Sherekh; Fred Holling] -- A collection of sample texts that offer students of Slavic philology and overview of the history of the three Eastern Slavic languages: Russian, Belorussian, and Ukrainian.

A useful resource for the serious history enthusiast. Dvornik discusses the East, West and South Slavs from the sixth to the 19th centuries.

The casual reader will find this book too detailed and densely written to be s: 6. Terence R. Carlton's INTRODUCTION TO THE PHONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE SLAVIC LANGUAGES is a behemoth of a book that traces sound changes from the remote Indo-European past to the present-day Slavic languages.

There are lots of introductions to Slavic historical phonology, but Carlton's is special for two reasons/5(2). More than million people in Europe speak one of the many Slavic languages and dialects, but the origins and development of Slavic culture are still among the most difficult problems facing archaeologists.

P.M. Barford's book is a remarkably comprehensive and accessible synthesis of the most recent archaeological discoveries, linguistic research, and literary-historical evidence about the 4/5(3).

The Slavic people live in Europe, speak Slavic languages and share common culture and history. Today the Slavs inhabit most of Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans. The collection of Slavic folktales consists of nine books with folktales: 47 Russian folktales, seven Polish folktales, 35 Czech and Slovak folktales, 27 Ukrainian.

The Slavic languages, also known as the Slavonic languages, are Indo-European languages spoken primarily by the Slavic peoples or their descendants.

They are thought to descend from a proto-language called Proto-Slavic, spoken during the Early Middle Ages, which in turn is thought to have descended from the earlier Proto-Balto-Slavic language, linking the Slavic languages to the Baltic.

This book documents developments in the countries of eastern Europe, including the rise of authoritarian tendencies in Russia and Belarus, as well as the victory of the democratic 'Orange Revolution' in Ukraine, and poses important questions about the origins of the East Slavic nations and the essential similarities or differences between their cultures/5(11).

Slavic languages - Slavic languages - Grammatical characteristics: Most Slavic languages reflect the old Proto-Slavic pattern of seven case forms (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, locative, instrumental, vocative), which occurred in both the singular and the plural.

There was also a dual number, meaning two persons or things. In the dual, the cases that were semantically close to each.

Advanced Russian Through History is a Russian reader for students working towards advanced and superior level proficiency in Russian.

The book consists of thirty-six chapters focusing on the history of Russia, from Kievan Rus' to the post-Soviet era. Each chapter is accompanied by a corresponding minilecture and related learning tasks on the Web. The Slavic group of languages - the fourth largest Indo-European sub-group - is one of the major language families of the modern world.

With million speakers, Slavic comprises 13 languages split into three groups: South Slavic, which includes Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian; East Slavic, which includes Russian and Ukrainian; and West Slavic, which includes Polish, Czech and Slovak.

Chapter IX, over one hundred pages long, is a relatively detailed summary of the major differences in the individual languages, with a section devoted to each language, as well as subsections on various questions associated with each language or sets of languages (e.g., a comparison of Czech and Slovak, a comparison of the East Slavic languages.

Reader in the history of the eastern Slavic languages Russian, Belorussian, Ukrainian Додано: 22 Квітня, Автор: Ed. George Y. Shevelov and Fred Holling Опубліковано: New. History of the Slavic Languages. Slavic languages are a group of related languages that emerged among the Slavs, an ethnic group whose origins are little known.

According to Ancient History Encyclopedia, the first noted records of the Slavs appeared in the sixth century. However, the group itself likely had far older origins. Jordanes had written his work, “Gothic History” in or AD which was a combination of different works and sources. These sources included references to the Slavic tribes, either through oral history, other books or perhaps maps that documented the existence of these tribes.

Published by: Slovanská unie z. Keywords: Interslavic language; reader book; teaching book; anthology; Summary/Abstract: Interslavic reader is a collection of working texts for teaching the Interslavic language which is an auxiliary language being very similar to the ethnic Slavic languages spoken in Central and Eastern Europe and.

A practical guide to the ancient magical tradition of Russian sorcery and Eastern Slavic magical rites • Offers step-by-step instructions for more than spells, incantations, charms, amulets, and practical rituals for love, career success, protection, healing, divination, communicating with spirits and ancestors, and other challenges and situations.

PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize. American Teachers of Slavic and Eastern European Languages Prize for Outstanding Translation from a Slavic Language. William Riley Parker Prize of the Modern Language Association. American Council of Learned Societies Postdoctoral Fellowship.Old Russian Online Series Introduction Todd B.

Krause and Jonathan Slocum. The title Old Russian serves to denote the language of the earliest documents of the eastern branch of the Slavic family of languages. The composition of the oldest surviving documents generally dates to some time within the 10th century AD.From toRussian and other Slavic studies were administratively a branch of Oriental Studies at the University of Washington.

First in the Department of Oriental Studies (), then in the Far Eastern Department (), and finally in the Department of Far Eastern and Slavic Languages & Literatures ().